KNUCKLE SOUP • Third Space


Knuckle Soup, installation view, Third Space, 2014 (photo Miriam Nielsen)



Knuckle Soup, acrylic and watercolour on paper in acrylic aquarium, with water elements and Mantis Shrimp. 77 x 60 cm. 2014 (photo: Miriam Nielsen)



Knuckle Soup, acrylic and watercolour on paper in acrylic aquarium, with water elements and Mantis Shrimp. 77 x 60 cm. 2014 (photo: Miriam Nielsen)



Knuckle Soup, acrylic and watercolour on paper in acrylic aquarium, with water elements and Peacock Mantis Shrimp. 77 x 60 cm. 2014 (photo: Miriam Nielsen)


Knuckle Soup, live footage of Peacock Mantis Shrimp



Knuckle Soup, installation view, Third Space, 2014 (photo Miriam Nielsen)



Untittled, speedbag, wood and metal. 2014 (photo: Miriam Nielsen)

The Flat Face Theory, performed two times during the exhibition. Sound by Anne Gry Kristensen and Kristian Poulsen
Video by Miriam Nielsen.




Soup, acrylic and watercolour on paper and MDF - enclosed by radiant acrylic capsule,
70 x 50 cm. 2014 (photo: Miriam Nielsen)



Soup, acrylic and watercolour on paper and MDF - enclosed by radiant acrylic capsule,
70 x 50 cm. 2014 (photo: Miriam Nielsen)




Knuckle Soup, installation view, Third Space, 2014 (photo Miriam Nielsen)



K N U C K L E · S O U P

Paintings in souplike water. Living Mantis Shrimps. The rythm of knuckles.

The exhibition Knuckle Soup revolves around fistfights among animals and humans.
Silas Inoue explores the concept of aggression as a cultural expression, and as a primordial and instinctive form of behaviour. Through performance and painterly works, he creates an installation that is at once humorous and thought provoking.

In the performance titled The Flat Face Theory, the accelerating rhythm of a speed bag
(normally used in boxing exercises) is synthesized with notes created by the sound artist duo Anne Gry Kristensen and Kristian Poulsen. The performance is inspired by a brand new theory on the evolution of the human face, in which it is argued that our flat face structure is a consequence of violence among the apes we descent from. Or more accurately, our features are the result of centuries of being punched in the face. The Flat Face Theory evolves in a reaction to each punch on the speed bag. The sound is calculated by a computer where the power and duration of each punch determines how the pre-programmed composition progresses.

The performance is accompanied by a series of “living paintings”. The series consists of 3 specially constructed aquariums, in which acrylic paintings inspired by envisions of the primordial soup serve as underwater environments for one of natures most aggressive species; namely the Mantis Shrimp. The Mantis Shrimp has over a period of thousands of years developed outstanding abilities, such as the hardest punch in the animal kingdom, which is measured to reach the speed of a 22-caliber slug. These punches are used to open shells of prey and to fight rivals. Further more the mantis shrimp posses the most complex eyes yet discovered in the world, with an ability to sense ultraviolet light, and a broad spectrum of colors invisible to humans. The 3 Mantis Shrimps will live and feed on living prey in the gallery during the whole period of Knuckle Soup.

With the exhibition Knuckle Soup the white cube-like room of Third Space has become a setting for stylized aggression. The violent shrimps are confined within aesthetically created aquariums, and the rhythmic beatings of Silas Inoues fists almost become music, while echoing the theory of the flat-faced apes.

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Knuckle Soup is supported by The Danish Arts Foundation,
and City of Copenhagen Committee of Visual Art